The Top Digital Health Technologies Helping Refugees

The Top Digital Health Technologies Helping Refugees

Writes the United Nations diplomat for Refugees (UNHCR). However, refugees’ plea isn’t limited to people leaving their home country en bloc following atrocious wars or political instability, but are often that of anyone else, such as you and me, following unforeseen calamities, be it natural or man-made, resulting in similar situations.
The November 2018 Camp wildfire in Butte county, California, left thousands of individuals homeless and made others to relocate. Almost 10 percent of all disaster-related displacement in 2018 occurred within the us alone, consistent with the 2019 Global Report on Internal Displacement (GRID). That’s quite 1.2 million new displacements! The World Bank forecasts that by 2050, quite 140 million people will are forced to maneuver within their countries’ borders in three regions of the planet thanks to the consequences of global climate change, if no climate action is taken. As such, the increased frequency and intensity of natural events might become the most explanation for forced migration within the near future, putting people from developed and developing countries alike in situations almost like what refugees are experiencing immediately. We shouldn’t be indifferent to their struggle but attempt to empathize with them, as we could even be in their shoes. In this article we take a glance at how and which technology helps refugees in the whole world, which by extension can help those in similar situations within the future. Need medical service? There’s an app for that! As refugees are forced to migrate to other areas with a special cultural and political landscape than their own, they’re nevertheless in need of key services like shelter, food, education and healthcare. Thankfully, there are apps designed to assist those very people to seek out what they have. The web app Services Advisor does exactly that. Initially launched to assist Syrian refugees in Jordan, it helps users find the humanitarian services they have most like food, shelter and medicine. Users also are ready to filter services by type, location, and proximity to get the proper help at the proper time. Made together with the UNHCR, the online app is now available in Jordan and Turkey. Another web app called Shifra helps refugees gain access to evidence-based sexual and reproductive health information and services. It also features a feature directing users to trusted local clinics where they will access respectful and safe care. Considering the first-hand traumatic experience of many refugees, it doesn’t come as a surprise that this demographic is at higher risk of psychological state disorders. A study conducted by the Swedish Red Cross acknowledged that one in three Syrian refugees suffers from depression, anxiety, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Eugene Bann, co-founder of X2AI a Silicon Valley-based startup, told the Guardian. “People have depression, anxiety, a way of hopelessness, and fear of the unknown.” Bann’s company went on to make Karim, a customized chatbot designed to supply emotional support through conversations to refugees. When it involves education, it’s mostly about websites and services instead of apps that are present to assist refugees. for instance, Power.Coders offers programming training to refugees in three cities (Zurich, Lausanne and Turin) and later places them in an IT internship. because of the organization’s help, about 60% of participants find employment within the IT sector following the internship. Paper Airplanes on the opposite hand provides free, peer-to-peer language and professional skills over video conferencing to people from areas of conflict within the Middle East and North Africa region. Duolingo: breaking barriers Counting over 300 million global users, Duolingo may be a free language-learning service. Available as a sensible device app and on browsers, it uses gamification, complete with achievements, power-ups and leaderboards, to show a desired language (the service counts over 30 languages available to learn) during a fun and interactive way. It’s a very cool thanks to finally be ready to learn another language like Japanese in order that you’ll watch those anime without subs. But bypassing subs isn’t the sole use it’s. Interestingly, Duolingo has actually been wont to learn the language in countries in the whole world. For one, Swedish is that the hottest language to find out via the app in Sweden itself! This reflects the increased number of refugees migrating to the country in recent years. For similar reasons, English and Norwegian are the second hottest languages within the U.S. and Norway respectively, consistent with a Duolingo report. Moving to a far off country are often doubly challenging with a barrier. Seemingly simple tasks like posing for directions or buying food can end up to be a true ordeal.

But because of apps like Duolingo, overcoming this extra hurdle can help refugees ease their daily struggle. Portable diagnostic devices: hospitals on-the-go Refugees fairly often find yourself in refugee camps or if they’re even less lucky, in areas with none formal refugee camps. In Lebanon, about 70 percent of Syrian refugees live below the poverty level, with no access to camps nor vital services. Those people are in dire need of support and medical aid. Humanitarian aid doesn’t need formal infrastructures to deploy healthcare services to those in need and with the arrival of portable diagnostic devices, quality care outside of clinics may be a reality. Tools just like the Philips Lumify Portable Ultrasound are often wont to run quick assessments and even estimate fetal age of fetus in refugee camps or non-profit centers. The doctor’s signature device, the stethoscope, has also had a digital boost just like the eKuore Pro, which allows users to record their findings and share them should they have a second opinion. Our favourite device would be the Viatom Checkme Pro or the closest thing we’ve to Star Trek’s medical tricorder so far. This handheld portable tool is sort of multi-faceted functioning as a health tracker, ECG monitor, thermometer, sleep tracker and also measures your blood oxygen saturation and vital sign. quite tingling your inner geek self, the Viatom Checkme Pro poses as an adequate medical Swiss knife for medical care in humanitarian crises. 3D printing: replacing the lost As sci-fi as this might sound, 3D printing of limbs is feasible and is being done to exchange lost limbs of refugees from war-torn areas. one among the leaders of this movement is Refugee Open Ware, an NGO that works to, among other initiatives, provide refugees with 3D-printed prosthetics for free of charge using open-source designs. The latter are made in 36 hours at a cost of $50 (but offered freed from charge to refugees because of donations).

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